Efficacy of methylcobalam in to normalise elevated homocysteine of vitamin B12 deficient vegetarians: a double blind placebo control study

Obersby, D, Chappell, David, Dunnett, Andrew and Tsiami, Amalia (2015) Efficacy of methylcobalam in to normalise elevated homocysteine of vitamin B12 deficient vegetarians: a double blind placebo control study. Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science, 3 (3). pp. 187-196. ISSN 2347-467X

[img]
Preview
PDF
obersby 2015 Current Research in Nutrition.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (130kB) | Preview

Abstract

Vegetarians are known to be deficient in vitamin B12, due to a lack of dietary animal products,which can elevate plasma total homocysteine (tHcy). Elevated total tHcy can render vegetarians susceptible to cardiovascular disease (CVD).There are a limited number of published studies
in relation to the efficacy of methylcobalamin to normalise plasma tHcy of vitamin B12 deficient vegetarians.The primary objective of the present study was to explore the relationship between supplementary oral methylcobalamin and levels of tHcy of vitamin B12 deficient vegetarians; to reduce the risk of developing primary CVD. A randomised double blind placebo controlled pilot study was
conducted to monitor and analyse baseline and post treatment levels of plasma tHcy, 49 volunteer
vegetarians were recruited to participate in this study. Statistical analysis employing SPSS software indicated that methylcobalamin reduced mean baseline plasma tHcy of 15.5 μmolL-1 (n=39) to a mean plasma tHcy level of 8.4 μmolL-1 (P < 0.001). In a second group that contained details of ten
withdrawn participants, which was conducted on an ‘Intention to Treat’ (ITT) basis, indicated that
methylcobalamin was shown to be reduced from a mean baseline plasma tHcy of 14.7 μmolL-1(n=49)to a mean plasma tHcy level of 9.1 μmolL-1 (P < 0.001).The findings of the study have the potential to alert vegetarians of the possible risk of becoming vitamin B12 deficient, and to help avoid the risk of developing homocysteine related CVD. The quality data obtained in the study will allow an
accurate sample size to be calculated for a future definite clinical study.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Medicine and health > Nutrition
Depositing User: Amalia Tsiami
Date Deposited: 15 Apr 2018 10:21
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2018 12:07
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/4837

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Menu