Six ways of experiencing information literacy in nursing: the findings of a phenomenographic study

Forster, Marc (2015) Six ways of experiencing information literacy in nursing: the findings of a phenomenographic study. Nurse Education Today, 35 (1). pp. 195-200. ISSN 0260-6917

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Abstract

Background

Information literacy plays a vital role in evidence-based practice in nursing. However there is currently little evidence to show how being information literate is actually experienced by nurses and therefore information literacy educational interventions are not genuinely evidence-based. Are they promoting the appropriate knowledge and skills to help nurses find and use the research evidence they need?

Objectives

To investigate how being information literate is experienced by nurses. To use the insights obtained to develop a description of the parameters of information literacy in nursing, including those of its role and value in evidence-based practice.

Design

Phenomenography.

Participants

41 UK nurses of varying experience, specialism and background.

Methods

Open-ended interviews.

Results

7 contexts in which information literacy is experienced, were mapped out and 6 representative ways of being an information literate nurse, in increasing levels of depth and sophistication, were described.

Conclusions

These findings may form the basis of future evidence-based information literacy education programmes.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: evidence-based practice; information literacy; nursing education; phenomenography
Subjects: Library and information sciences
Medicine and health > Nursing
Depositing User: Marc Forster
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2015 10:45
Last Modified: 14 Jul 2017 10:37
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1108

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