COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in diverse groups in the UK—is the driver economic or cultural in student populations

Drobniewski, Francis, Kusuma, Dian, Broda, Agnieszka, Castro-Sánchez, Enrique ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3351-9496 and Ahmad, Raheelah (2022) COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in diverse groups in the UK—is the driver economic or cultural in student populations. Vaccines, 10 (4). p. 501.

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Abstract

Studies have identified a greater reluctance for members of the Black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities to be vaccinated against COVID-19 despite a higher probability of greater harm from COVID-19. We conducted an anonymised questionnaire-based study of students (recruiting primarily before first reports of embolic events) at two London universities to identify whether economic or educational levels were primarily responsible for this reluctance: a postgraduate core group (PGCC) n=860 and a pilot study of undergraduate medical and nursing students (n=103). Asian and Black students were 2.0 and 3.2 times (PGCC) less likely to accept the COVID vaccine than White British students. Similar findings were noted in the pilot study students. As students were studying for Masters or PhD degrees and voluntarily paying high fees, educational and economic reasons were unlikely to be the underlying cause, and wider cultural reservations were more likely. Politicians exerted a strong negative in-fluence, suggesting that campaigns should omit politicians.

Item Type: Article
Identifier: 10.3390/vaccines10040501
Additional Information: The study was partially funded by Horizon Europe grant No. 101046016 — EuCARE: European Cohorts of Patients and Schools to Advance Response to Epidemics. FD is supported by the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre. RA, as Knowledge Mobilisation Lead, acknowledges the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance at Imperial College London. The views expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the NHS.
Keywords: covid-19; vaccine hesitancy; students; healthcare workers
Subjects: Medicine and health > Health promotion and public health
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Enrique Castro Sanchez
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2022 12:07
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2022 10:51
URI: https://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/8870

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