Feldenkrais, Freud, Lacan, and Gould: how to love thyself not as thy neighbour

Sholl, Robert (2021) Feldenkrais, Freud, Lacan, and Gould: how to love thyself not as thy neighbour. In: The Feldenkrais method in creative practice: dance, music, and theatre. Bloomsbury Methuen, London, UK, pp. 38-54. ISBN 9781350158382 (In Press)

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Abstract

This study addresses a form of anthropology of Feldenkrais’s thought. At the beginning of his book The Potent Self, Feldenkrais responds to Christ’s commandment “Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself” (Matthew 22:39). Feldenkrais was a great reader of Freud who wrote about this injunction. Sholl shows the connections and differentiations between Feldenkrais, and Freud and Jacques Lacan’s use of this idea. He then connects this thinking to a discussion of the Canadian pianist Glenn Gould’s decision (in 1964) to stop playing the piano in public. He argues that Gould’s decision to re-organize himself through recording was a way to learn to use himself more intelligently (negotiating compulsion), to refine his own self-image, and to enhance his uniqueness. Finally, Sholl examines Gould provides an exemplar for creative artists and performance-training through the development of uniqueness, “potency” and self-awareness better “to love thy neighbour” (conceived as the listening public).

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This book contains essays from scholars and creative practititoners examining historical, scientific and practical ways in which the Feldenkrais Method can be engaged with creative practice. My own article is entitled: Feldenkrais, Freud, Lacan and Gould: How to Love thyself for thy Neighbour
Subjects: Music > Musicology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Robert Sholl
Date Deposited: 29 May 2020 14:54
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2020 09:06
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/6991

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