Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty can restore normal spine mechanics following osteoporotic vertebral fracture

Luo, Jin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5451-9535, Adams, MA and Dolan, P (2010) Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty can restore normal spine mechanics following osteoporotic vertebral fracture. Journal of osteoporosis. ISSN 2090-8059

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Abstract

Osteoporotic vertebral fractures often lead to pain and disability. They can be successfully treated, and possibly prevented, by injecting cement into the vertebral body, a procedure known as vertebroplasty. Kyphoplasty is similar, except that an inflatable balloon is used to restore vertebral body height before cement is injected. These techniques are growing rapidly in popularity, and a great deal of recent research, reviewed in this paper, has examined their ability to restore normal mechanical function to fractured vertebrae. Fracture reduces the height and stiffness of a vertebral body, causing the spine to assume a kyphotic deformity, and transferring load bearing to the neural arch. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are equally able to restore vertebral stiffness, and restore load sharing towards normal values, although kyphoplasty is better at restoring vertebral body height. Future research should optimise these techniques to individual patients in order to maximise their beneficial effects, while minimising the problems of cement leakage and adjacent level fracture.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright © 2010 Jin Luo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Subjects: Construction and engineering > Biomedical engineering
Medicine and health > Clinical medicine
Medicine and health > Physiology
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Depositing User: Jin Luo
Date Deposited: 08 May 2020 22:17
Last Modified: 09 May 2020 13:40
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/6912

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