Strategies to reduce non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review

Mitchell, Brett G., Russo, Philip L., Cheng, Allen C., Stewardson, Andrew J., Rosebrock, Hannah, Curtis, Stephanie J., Robinson, Sophia and Kiernan, Martin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9926-7781 (2019) Strategies to reduce non-ventilator-associated hospital-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review. Infection, Disease & Health, 24 (4). pp. 229-239. ISSN 2468-0451

[img]
Preview
PDF
1-s2.0-S2468045119300215-main.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (653kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF
Kiernan_etal_IDH_2019_Strategies_to_reduce_non-ventilator-associatedhospital-acquired_pneumonia_A_systematic_review.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (545kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Point prevalence studies identify that pneumonia is the most common healthcare associated infection. However, non-ventilator associated healthcare associated pneumonia (NV-HAP) is both underreported and understudied. Most research conducted to date, focuses on ventilator associated pneumonia. We conducted a systematic review, to provide the latest evidence for strategies to reduce NV-HAP and describe the methodological approaches used.

METHODS:
We performed a systematic search to identify research exploring and evaluating NV-HAP preventive measures in hospitals and aged-care facilities. The electronic database Medline was searched, for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st January 1998 and 31st August 2018. An assessment of the study quality and risk of bias of included articles was conducted using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.

RESULTS:
The literature search yielded 1551 articles, with 15 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The majority of strategies for NV-HAP prevention focussed on oral care (n = 9). Three studies evaluated a form of physical activity, such as passive movements, two studies used dysphagia screening and management; and another study evaluated prophylactic antibiotics. Most studies (n = 12) were conducted in a hospital setting. Six of the fifteen studies were randomised controlled trials.

CONCLUSION:
There was considerable heterogeneity in the included studies, including the type of intervention, study design, methods and definitions used to diagnose the NV-HAP. To date, interventions to reduce NV-HAP appear to be based broadly on the themes of improving oral care, increased mobility or movement and dysphagia management.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Infection control; Healthcare-associated pneumonia; Nursing care; Systematic review
Subjects: Medicine and health
Depositing User: Kevin Sanders
Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2019 12:38
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2020 10:05
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/6222

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Menu