Examining the association between adverse childhood experiences and harmful health behavioral risk factors among older adults with multimorbidity in northern Nigeria

Ahmed, Abdulsalam, Khan, Hafiz T.A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1817-3730 and Lawal, Muili (2022) Examining the association between adverse childhood experiences and harmful health behavioral risk factors among older adults with multimorbidity in northern Nigeria. In: X. International symposium of social and applied gerontology, 21-23 Nov 2022, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been associated with increased risky health behavior and poor health outcomes later in life. And little is known about this connection in high-violence, low-resource settings like Nigeria where exposure to ACEs is common throughout the life course. And thus, the study was structured to determine this connection. By answering the research question. Does ACE increase the risk of developing health risk behavior among patients with multimorbidity in Niger state, north-central Nigeria?
Methods: A quantitative-cross-sectional study was utilized. Questionnaires were administered to 734 multimorbid patients aged 60 years and over with 2 or more chronic diseases who visit for routine ambulatory outpatient and consented to participate in the study from 4 high-volume hospitals in Niger state over 5 months. Face-to-face data was collected electronically via JISC online survey software between October 2021 to February 2022. The data was analyzed by IBM SPSS version 27 sourced from the University of West London.
Results: ACE scores were predictive of risk behaviors and the dosing relationship of ACEs for harmful health risk behaviors was significant. Gender-adjusted binary logistic regression shows that individuals having 4 or more ACEs are more likely to engage in smoking (AOR = 1.592, 95% CI 0.427, 5.927) and alcohol consumption (AOR= 1.078, 95% CI 0.430, 2.701) than individuals with less than 4 ACEs.
Conclusion:
The study hypothesized that individuals with 4 or more ACEs are at increased risk of smoking and drinking alcohol. Therefore, early identification of ACEs or their health consequences must be a priority for health practitioners, educators, social support workers, and policymakers to enhance policies and programs that will support families and conducive environments.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Speech)
Subjects: Medicine and health
Depositing User: Hafiz T.A. Khan
Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2022 08:48
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2022 11:36
URI: https://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/9653

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