STI-protective self-efficacy and binge drinking in a sample of university students in the United Kingdom

Johnson, Henry Lee, Albery, Ian P, Frings, Daniel and Moss, Antony C (2018) STI-protective self-efficacy and binge drinking in a sample of university students in the United Kingdom. Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare, 17. pp. 19-25. ISSN 1877-5756 (In Press)

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Abstract

Objective: Alcohol use has consistently been shown to be related to sexual risk-taking behaviours. To assess what factors may contribute to the sexual risk decision-making process, this study examined the relationships among alcohol use (frequency, quantity, and binge drinking), cognitive appraisals of sexual risk taking, sex-related alcohol expectancies, and STI-protective self-efficacy. Method: 138 sexually-active university students who drink alcohol completed scales measuring alcohol consumption, appraisals of consequences, sex-related alcohol expectancies, and items regarding STI-protective self-efficacy. Results: Increasing levels of binge drinking were negatively associated with STI-protective self-efficacy. A moderated mediation analysis revealed that for binge drinkers, stronger appraisals of the positive consequences for having sexual intercourse while intoxicated predicted lower STI-protective self-efficacy indirectly through increasing rates of sex-related alcohol risk expectancies. Conclusion: Findings provide evidence of a need to target binge drinkers and increase their STI-protective self-efficacy by shifting their focus from positive consequences to negative risk consequences of engaging in sexual intercourse while intoxicated.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: STIs, interventions, risk behaviours, sexual behaviours, condoms
Subjects: Psychology > Substance abuse/misuse
Psychology
Depositing User: Henry Johnson
Date Deposited: 23 May 2018 11:54
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2018 12:21
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/5073

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