2020 COVID-19-related lockdown: the relationships between coping strategies, psychological adjustment and resilience among a non-clinical sample of British adults

Lafarge, Caroline ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2148-078X, Milani, Raffaella Margherita ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1683-2410, Görzig, Anke ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7623-0836 and Cahill, Sharon (2022) 2020 COVID-19-related lockdown: the relationships between coping strategies, psychological adjustment and resilience among a non-clinical sample of British adults. Adversity and Resilience Science.

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Abstract

Background and objectives
To curb COVID-19 infections, the British government enforced a series of lockdowns resulting in restrictions on movement and socialisation. This study assessed which groups may have been at higher risk of emotional distress among a non-clinical sample of British adults. It also examined which coping strategies, if any, related to more positive psychological adjustment and higher resilience scores.
Methods
A cross-sectional, correlational study was carried out. Using a convenience sample, an online survey was conducted in April-June 2020. 194 participants completed the Brief COPE (coping), the GAD-7 (anxiety), the PHQ-9 (depression), the CD-RISC (resilience) and provided demographic information.
Results
Participants used mainly coping strategies considered to be adaptive. They exhibited mild/moderate anxiety and depression symptoms, and moderate resilience scores. However, some individuals displayed significantly higher distress symptoms and lower resilience scores than others, especially those aged under 35 (particularly 18-24), those not working, those who were single and/or childless. Results also show that coping strategies including substance use, behavioural disengagement and self-blame were associated with anxiety and/or depression symptoms. Conversely, positive reframing related to lower anxiety symptomatology.
Conclusions
Interventions promoting positive reframing may be helpful. Similarly, interventions promoting connection to others, a factor known to enhance resilience, may be beneficial. This is particularly relevant to groups who may be more at risk of psychological distress, such as young individuals.

Item Type: Article
Identifier: 10.1007/s42844-022-00079-5
Additional Information: This version of the article has been accepted for publication, after peer review (when applicable) and is subject to Springer Nature’s AM terms of use, but is not the Version of Record and does not reflect post-acceptance improvements, or any corrections. The Version of Record is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42844-022-00079-5
Keywords: COVID-19; lockdown; coping; resilience; anxiety; depression; adversity
Subjects: Psychology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Caroline Lafarge
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2022 15:01
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2022 14:39
URI: https://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/9444

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