Comparing the demographic characteristics, and reported abuse types, contexts and outcomes of help-seeking heterosexual male and female victims of domestic violence: Part II – Exit from specialist services

Hine, Ben ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9732-4631, Bates, Elizabeth, Nicola, Graham-Kevan and Jennifer, Mackay (2021) Comparing the demographic characteristics, and reported abuse types, contexts and outcomes of help-seeking heterosexual male and female victims of domestic violence: Part II – Exit from specialist services. Partner Abuse: New Directions in Research, Intervention, and Policy. ISSN 1946-6560 (In Press)

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Abstract

The present study represents the second part of a two-part project that has sought to explore the demographic characteristics, assessment of abuse risks, and provision needs of service users of specialist Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) services in the United Kingdom (UK; see Hine, Bates, et al., in press for Part 1). The current study utilised a large-scale quantitative data set of 27,876 clients (734 men and 27,142 women) exiting from specialist DVA services within the UK between 2007 and 2017. Across the sample there were significant reductions in abuse upon discharge from services, with most participants no longer living with their abusive partner. There were some significant differences between male and female clients, but most had small or negligible effect sizes. For example, men were more likely to be still living with their abuser (twice as many men as women), and for those not living together men were more likely to report ongoing contact. Women were found to have significantly higher reported rates of improved quality of life and overall safety. The findings are discussed in line with recommendations for future research and practice, including the more widespread commissioning of ‘gender inclusive’ provision which acknowledges differential risks associated with male and female clients.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: domestic violence; help-seeking; service engagement; service provision; gender inclusivity
Subjects: Psychology
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Ben Hine
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2021 04:28
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2021 14:27
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/8020

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