Health monitoring of trees and investigation of tree root systems using ground penetrating radar (GPR)

Lantini, Livia ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0416-1077 (2021) Health monitoring of trees and investigation of tree root systems using ground penetrating radar (GPR). Doctoral thesis, University of West London.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Lantini - PhD Thesis (Final).pdf - Accepted Version

Download (11MB) | Preview

Abstract

Evidence suggests that trees and forests around the world are constantly being threatened by disease and environmental pressures. Over the last decade, new pathogens spread rapidly in European forests, and quarantine measures have mostly been unable to contain outbreaks. As a result, millions of trees were infected, and many of these have already died. It is therefore vital to identify infected trees in order to track, control and prevent disease spread.
In addressing these challenges, the available methods often include cutting of branches and trees or incremental coring of trees. However, not only do the tree itself and its surrounding environment suffer from these methods, but they also are costly, laborious and time-consuming.
In recent years the application of non-invasive testing techniques has been accepted and valued in this particular area. Given its flexibility, rapidity of data collection and cost-efficiency, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been increasingly used in this specific area of research. Consequently, this PhD Thesis aims at addressing a major challenge within the context of early identification of tree decay and tree disease control using GPR. In more detail, two main topics are addressed, namely the characterisation of the internal structure of tree trunks, and the assessment of tree root systems’ architecture. As a result, a comprehensive methodology for the assessment of both tree trunks and roots using GPR is presented, which includes the implementation of novel algorithms and GPR signal processing approaches for the characterisation of tree trunks’ internal structure and the three-dimensional mapping of tree root systems. Results of this research project were promising and will contribute towards the establishment of novel tree evaluation approaches.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: Construction and engineering
Depositing User: Livia Lantini
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2021 14:14
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2021 14:14
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/8015

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Menu