Impact of malnutrition on propofol consumption and recovery time among patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

Tian, Xuebi, Xiang, Yan, Fan, Ying, Bu, Hui-Lian, Yang, Hui, Manyande, Anne, Gao, Feng and Tian, Yu-Ke (2014) Impact of malnutrition on propofol consumption and recovery time among patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 58 (8). pp. 942-947. ISSN 0001-5172

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Abstract

Background
Malnutrition is a major health problem, especially in hospitalized patients as it can be closely related to many post-operative complications. However, research on malnutrition and its effect on the outcome of general anesthesia have been largely neglected. Here we investigated malnutrition status on propofol consumption and recovery time among patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery under general anesthesia.

Methods
One hundred and one patients were recruited between January and June 2012 at Tongji Hospital and assigned into three groups according to Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 score. A standard combined general anesthesia procedure was performed under regular monitoring. The dosage of propofol needed for induction, consumption during maintenance and recovery time were recorded.

Results
When compared with normal nutritional status individuals, the propofol dosage at induction was significantly decreased about 4.3% in moderate malnutritional status patients (P < 0.01) and about 16.8% in severely malnutritional status patients (P < 0.01). The average consumption of propofol was also significantly lower in malnourished individuals; for moderate malnutritional, the decrease was about 20% (P < 0.01) while for the severely malnutritional, it was 30% (P < 0.01) when compared with normal nutritional status individuals. For the recovery time of propofol anesthesia, the patients with severe malnutritional status awoke average 6.8 min later than those normally nourished (P < 0.01), but those patients with moderate malnutrition status did not (P = 0.885).

Conclusion
The present results indicate that the dosage and recovery time of propofol does change in malnourished individuals. Therefore, malnutrition may somehow affect the outcome of general anesthesia.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Article first published online: 24 JUL 2014
Subjects: Psychology
Depositing User: Anne Manyande
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2015 15:01
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2017 10:58
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1301

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