The attitudes and behaviour of hotel chefs and chef lecturers regarding the use of convenience ingredients

Lorimer, Ray (2014) The attitudes and behaviour of hotel chefs and chef lecturers regarding the use of convenience ingredients. Masters thesis, University of West London.

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Abstract

This study examined and compared the attitudes and behaviours of chefs towards convenience ingredients and their use in four and five star hotel restaurant kitchens and catering college kitchen classrooms. Chefs are in a unique position to influence food ingredient purchases, and their selection of ingredients and the rationale for such choices is used in this thesis to perform a comparative analysis and gain understanding of any attitudinal and behavioural relationships that may affect the acceptance, sales, use and development of convenience ingredients, and to fill a gap in understanding in an under-researched sector of food service within the hospitality industry.

Data was collected using the mixed methods (triangulation) of quantitative survey and qualitative (semi-structured) interviews from a sample of 253 senior hotel chefs and college chef lecturers throughout the United Kingdom. Key findings were that convenience ingredients are used extensively, and that their acceptability is enhanced by functional factors such as food safety, waste control and cost and labour, however 30% of hotel chefs were resistant to their use and both sets of respondents believed that convenience ingredients are a cause of de-skilling within the professional kitchen. A new definition of convenience ingredients was developed and accepted by over 60% of both sets of respondents and over 80% of both sets agreed that there is a need for on-line e-Learning about ingredient use within recipe development with a strong focus on healthier food and special diets (allergens). These findings provide academics, practitioners, educationalists, food manufacturers and suppliers with new data and an opportunity to further enhance learning, innovation, development and the sales of an ingredient phenomenon that is current practice but still divides opinion within the foodservice sector of the food industry.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: Hospitality and tourism
Depositing User: Rod Pow
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2015 15:13
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2016 21:59
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1103

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