Usefulness as a social construct: a study of cultural contrasts between system producers and users

Abdelnour-Nocera, Jose and Dunckley, Lynne (2005) Usefulness as a social construct: a study of cultural contrasts between system producers and users. In: 7th International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems, 7-9 July 2005, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Abstract

This paper explores how the different contexts and cultures of producers and users of a Information System shape their meaning and understanding of usefulness. The concepts of ‘breakdown’ in the use of systems and ‘technological frames’ are identified as analytic tools used in this qualitative study. An ethnographic study of producers identified aspects of their context and culture influencing their notion of usefulness. The study of breakdowns in four user sites (Indonesia, Spain, Hong Kong and the UK) identified the different meanings with which users constructed usefulness. It was found that the definitions of how useful a system is and of the problems it is deemed to solve are not static but negotiable, fluid and subject to the socio-cultural perspectives and practices of both producers and users.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: Computing
Depositing User: Vani Aul
Date Deposited: 21 Feb 2014 12:33
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2017 12:51
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/680

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