Elementary education in Eritrea: how mother tongue education policy affects pupils and their access to education

Olden, Tony and Bokre, Desta Arefaine (2006) Elementary education in Eritrea: how mother tongue education policy affects pupils and their access to education. Alexandria, 18 (2). pp. 81-95. ISSN 0955-7490

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Eritrea, a country in the Horn of Africa with a population of over four million, has nine languages and a mother tongue education policy for its elementary schools. This paper investigates the impact of the policy on the design and implementation of elementary education in this developing country, and on the dissemination of information to pupils. A survey was conducted of fifty-eight interviewees drawn from the nine ethnic groups: the heads of the language panels in the National Department of Curriculum; elementary school teachers, trainee teachers, school directors; and parents. The research reveals the issues a multilingual society with minority ethnic groups faces in opting for mother tongue education at elementary level. There are not enough qualified and experienced educators to prepare the curriculum, and there are the challenges of translating and of turning spoken into written language. There is a lack of literature other than textbooks to refer to, and there are virtually no libraries in elementary schools. However, when elementary pupils learn and read through the medium of their first language it grounds their education in the real world. The curriculum is also an important tool in preserving, using and developing the languages of Eritrea.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Education
Depositing User: Rod Pow
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2012 15:28
Last Modified: 27 Jan 2017 09:59
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/309

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Menu