Individuals with risk of metabolic syndrome are more likely to use variety of dietary and complementary and alternative supplements

Rajadurai, Akilen, Tsiami, Amalia A. and Robinson, Nicola (2014) Individuals with risk of metabolic syndrome are more likely to use variety of dietary and complementary and alternative supplements. Advances in Integrative Medicine, 1 (3). pp. 131-137. ISSN 2212-9588

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Abstract

Background: It has been observed that users of dietary supplements are people who want to take care of their health. In this context, it is conceivable that awareness of a metabolic disorder, such as diabetes or hypertension, makes people more receptive to supplement use. The aim of this study is to determine whether individuals with self-reported features of metabolic syndrome (FeMS) were more likely to use different dietary and CAM supplements compared with individuals without self-reported FeMS.
Method: Using a cross sectional study design, information was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. A total of 300 individuals invited to participate in this study. FeMS was defined by any individuals having at least one self-reported, clinically diagnosed medical condition of diabetes or hypertension or dyslipidemia or obesity. Finally, two categories were created for cross tabulation analysis; Individuals with and without FeMS. The questionnaire was developed by bearing in mind the requirements for cross tabulation and reporting. Cross tabulation yielded information about any correlations between dietary and CAM supplementation practices and FeMS.
Results: Of the 210 individuals completed the study, 32% (n=66) were currently using or had used dietary supplements in the past 12 months. The five most common dietary supplements used was found to be; multi vitamins (38%), fish oils (35%), calcium (26%), different herbal supplements (24%) and omega 3 oils (24%). Individuals with FeMS (n=54; 28%) were more likely (P<0.05) to use different types of CAM therapies and less likely to report or discuss the use of dietary and CAM supplements with their general practitioner (P=0.043).
Discussion: Individuals with FeMS were more likely to use different dietary and CAM supplements than individuals without FeMS (P<0.001). FeMS is an independent predictor of dietary supplement use. Dietary supplement use is more common in older individuals and those with more than high school education.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Dietary supplements; Metabolic syndrome; Diabetes; Hypertension; Dyslipidaemia and obesity
Subjects: Medicine and health > Nutrition
Depositing User: Amalia Tsiami
Date Deposited: 17 Jun 2016 09:20
Last Modified: 01 Sep 2016 13:23
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/2635

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