Chapter 15 Epidemiology of Reported Infections amongst Patients Receiving Dialysis for Established Renal Failure in England from May 2011 to April 2012: a Joint Report from Public Health England and the UK Renal Registry

Crowley, Lisa, Pitcher, David, Wilson, Jennie, Guy, Rebecca and Fluck, Richard (2013) Chapter 15 Epidemiology of Reported Infections amongst Patients Receiving Dialysis for Established Renal Failure in England from May 2011 to April 2012: a Joint Report from Public Health England and the UK Renal Registry. Nephron Clinical Practice, 125. pp. 295-308.

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Official URL: DOI: 10.1159/000360034

Abstract

Introduction: Infection remains one of the leading causes of mortality in established renal failure patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT). Since 2007, centres providing RRT in England have been asked to provide additional data on patients with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia. Since 2011, the option to provide data on methicillin sensitive Stapylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Escherichia coli bacteraemia, as well as Clostridium difficile infection has also been available. Methods:Data were submitted to Public Health England by laboratories via HCAI-DCS including whether the patients were receiving dialysis. Individual renal centres then confirmed the record either directly via the database or after beingcontacted. Data were collected for the period of the 1st May 2011 to the 30th April 2012. Results: There were 49 episodes of MRSA bacteraemia, an overall rate of 0.22 per 100 dialysis patients per year, representing a further year on year fall in MRSA rate. There were a higher number of MSSA episodes, 322 in total, with an overall rate of 1.15
per 100 dialysis patients per year. The number of episodes and overall rate of E. coli and C. difficile were 284 and 0.92 per 100 prevalent dialysis patients per year and 172 and 0.61 per 100 prevalent dialysis patients per year respectively. In each infection type the presence of a central venous catheter appeared to correlate with an elevated risk. Conclusions: Data are presented from one year of infections reported to PHE. The rate of MRSA bacteraemia episodes in England continues to fall. There was a higher rate of MSSA infections amongst renal dialysis patients. Findings
from the first year of E. coli and C. difficile data collection are also reported. Future cycles will give us a further idea of the trend in incidences of these infections.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Medicine and health
Depositing User: Jennie Wilson
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2016 09:34
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2017 15:02
URI: http://repository.uwl.ac.uk/id/eprint/2351

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